Flight Attendant & Pregnancy

ALL THINGS TRAVEL, Pregnancy

Being a flight attendant and being pregnant are both challenging but when you’re both at the same time you can imagine how one can impact the other.

For this post I’m going to share my experience as a pregnant flight attendant but please note that my experience could and most likely is completely different from someone else’s experience.

I am currently 23 weeks pregnant and for the most part I’m feeling ok. Back pain is starting to occur and I’ve had some slight cramping from what my doctor says is from my round ligaments not getting proper time to rest due to the nature of my job and caring for a 22 month old. Everything is safe and healthy, just uncomfortable and annoying especially when I’m working.

When it comes to performing the essential job functions I would say certain FA work positions are more challenging than the others. For me, it’s easiest if I’m one of the aisle FA’s meaning I’m the one in the aisle helping during boarding instead of being in the front or back of the plane setting up the galley’s. Galley positions are more physically demanding with lifting and bending more often so it’s more of a challenge for me. My belly still isn’t huge so I’m not exactly in the way when I’m in the aisle assisting with boarding yet.

I won’t lie when I say I’m exhausted by the end of he day even if I’m only doing 1-2 legs. Something about the higher altitude and just being on my feet for long periods of time makes me tired (or maybe I’m just out of shape).

I’ve spoken to my doctor about going out early for California State disability but since I’m healthy and no medical issues there isn’t a reason for me to be put on disability. At first I was upset because flying is tough on the body even if you aren’t pregnant so I was frustrated and felt like she didn’t understand the demands of my job, but after a day to stew, I’m actually very grateful that my baby and me are healthy. I feel fine as of now to continue working but it’s okay to fly (according to my doctor) up until 36 weeks. I honestly don’t think I’ll make it that far but we’ll see.

Now for those who have had miscarriages in the past or other medical challenges that put you in a high risk pregnancy I would definitely express your concerns to your doctor about going on disability/leave early, especially in the first trimester. I personally don’t have any experience but I’ve read and met enough women who said that flying increases the risk of miscarriage in the first trimester. So please do what you feel is best for yourself and your unborn child. Only you know what feels best, follow your intuitions.

I’ll be back with updates and let you all know how this whole experience is going.

Fly safe everyone!

How I Became a Flight Attendant

ALL THINGS TRAVEL

After graduating from college with a BA in Sociology I had full intentions of getting my masters in Social Work, but once I graduated I either wanted to take some time off or hopefully find a job where I could bypass the whole going back to school thing. My family has a history in the airline industry. My great grandfather owned his own airline in Alaska, grandmother worked for said airline, great aunt worked for Alaska Airlines and had just recently retired.

After a month of two of actively applying for jobs my sister finally mentioned that maybe I should apply at an airline. After researching airlines I applied to two airlines. One rejected me within two days (haha) and the other took weeks to send a reply. I eventually got an email stating I was moving forward in the interview process. I had to fill out a questionnaire/personality test. After passing that, a video interview. Finally an onsite interview which lasted the entire day! Then after passing the onsite process I had to pass my physical.

After 4 months of this application/hiring process I finally received a training date for flight attendant training. An 8.5 week program. This training is seriously no joke. It’s extremely fast pace. Did I mention that my training was unpaid also? Yeah that was a challenge in itself but it was totally worth it. I now have a job that I enjoy.

I now have been with my airline for almost 6 years now. I’ve had a few job title changes. I went into a management role right before I became pregnant (more on this in a future post) but I ended up back in the friendly skies because I feel like that’s where I’m meant to be. Though each flight has it’s challenges, at the end of the day I still very much love my job.

If you’re thinking of becoming a flight attendant, here are some tips during the interview process:

  1. A flight attendant is categorized as a customer service position. If you have customer service experience be sure to highlight that in your resume! I also wrote a cover letter further illustrating my customer service experience and why I’d be a great fit for the airline I was applying to.
  2. The personality assessment: be consistent throughout the questionnaire. From my understanding they’re looking for someone who is compassionate, consistent, and is a good judge of character. There are a lot of hypothetical questions so they want to see how you respond to certain situations (this is where you’re customer service skills come into play).
  3. If you get a video interview be sure to look the part! I’ve heard that some people only dress up from the waist up but I highly suggest getting fully dressed just to get you in the proper mindset. I did my hair in a bun and I kept my make up very natural.
  4. Onsite interview: really dress the part! I wore a pencil skirt, white blouse, and blazer. For women wear hosiery! This is very important. Hosiery is a requirement (at least my for company) in uniform so you should wear them for the interview. Hair should be tied back (I always suggest a bun) and a shade of red lipstick. You want to look the part as much as possible. For men, a suggest a nice suite, facial hair neatly groomed (no long beards) and hair either freshly cut or for those with longer hair make sure it’s tied back.
  5. Onsite: Make eye contact, smile, and speak with as many people as you come in contact with. They want to see that you’re approachable and kind.
  6. Be yourself! You don’t want to go into the interview putting on a different personality because if you do, the job will only be harder for you because you aren’t being yourself.

I hope these tips are helpful. These are my suggestions based on my interview process 6 years ago. I’m sure a lot has changed since than so please only take these as help suggestions and not rules to follow. I cannot guarantee anyone gets hired with an airline based on my helpful tips.

All the best for those going through the interview process!

Stay tuned for more information about my life as a flight attendant!